Category: In Review

The Deliciousness of Truth

Black and Buddhist: In the face of white supremacy, Buddhism reteaches us how to relate to truth and to one another. By Pamela Ayo Yetunde

A Full-Bodied Dharma

Black and Buddhist: Contributors to this volume take refuge in embodied practice and in vibrant community. By Judith Simmer-Brown

Freedom Doesn’t Happen in a Day

Four voices celebrate the publication of Black and Buddhist: What Buddhism Can Teach Us about Race, Resilience, Transformation, and Freedom. Buddhism offers practical tools to work through intergenerational trauma. By Cheryl A. Giles

Waiting for Queer Theology

Queer Theology: Beyond Apologetics, by Linn Marie Tonstad, awaits a theology that moves beyond the narrow genres allotted to it. By Mark D. Jordan

Giorgio Agamben, the Church, and Me

Italian philosopher and political theorist Giorgio Agamben’s The Kingdom and the Glory, The Church and the Kingdom, and The Omnibus Homo Sacer, and Simon Critchley’s The Faith of the Faithless offer resources for exploring the connections between temporality, political community, and ordained ministry. By Charles M. Stang

The Rise of ‘Spiritual but Not Religious’ Is a Story of Hope

Since the 2016 election, teaching Andrew Delbanco’s The Real American Dream and Catherine L. Albanese’s A Republic of Mind and Spirit has become more relevant and constructive, as this religious studies professor has come to view the rise of the spiritual but not religious as a story of hope. By Darryl Caterine

Apocalyptic Grief, Radical Joy

A selected list of readings, films, and art from the course, “Apocalyptic Grief, Radical Joy,” cotaught by Terry Tempest Williams and Matthew L. Potts

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